Category Archives: Catechesis

Latin Mass New Haven for December 8

The Feast of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary will be observed in a celebration of High Mass at St. Stanislaus Church, State Street at Eld Street, New Haven, this Sunday, December 8, at 2:00 p.m. The Reverend Matthew Mauriello will be the celebrant, and the Schola Cantorum of the St. Gregory Society will sing the Gregorian chant and polyphony for the service.

Although the Immaculate Conception of Our Lady was defined as dogma by Pope Pius IX on 8 December 1854, the veneration of Mary’s spotless holiness is far more ancient. The feast was observed in the East from the 8th century, in Ireland from the ninth, and in England from the eleventh.

As we anticipate the birth of Our Lord on Christmas, let us rejoice with the cry of admiration that the Church puts in our lips in the liturgy: “Tota pulchra es, Maria! – Thou art all fair, O Mary, unstained by original sin.” And so, the feast of the Immaculate Conception, coming in the course of Advent, heralds the splendors of the Incarnation of the Redeemer.

Music for the liturgy will include the Gregorian chant ordinary “Missa Marialis (Vatican ed. IX/X, the proper Gregorian chants, polyphonic  motets by Guillaume Dufay and Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, and organ music by Jean Titelouze.

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Latin Mass for the 24th and Last Sunday after Pentecost

The Twenty-fourth and Last Sunday after Pentecost will be observed in a celebration of High Mass at St. Stanislaus Church, State Street at Eld Street, New Haven, this Sunday, November 22, at 2:00 p.m. The Reverend Ian Pikulski will be the celebrant, and the Schola Cantorum of the St. Gregory Society will sing the Gregorian chant and polyphony for the service.

On this final Sunday of the Church Year, the Liturgy calls our minds to reflection on the end of this world. The dread of the Last Judgment invoked in the Gospel is offset by the promise of Christ’s second coming in glory with its promise of salvation for the faithful, as expressed in the Introit: “I think thoughts of peace, and not of affliction”.

During this time, let us meditate on last things—death, judgment, heaven and hell—and pray that we receive the discernment to choose to the good in our lives and to resist temptations to do evil.

Music for the liturgy will include the Gregorian chant ordinary “Missa Orbis factor” (Mass XI)  the proper Gregorian chants, motets by Heinrich Isaac and William Byrd, and organ music by Charles Tournemire and Alexandre Guilmant

Latin Mass in New Haven for Christ the King

The Feast of Christ the King will be observed in a celebration of Solemn Mass at St. Stanislaus Church, State Street at Eld Street in New Haven, on Sunday, 27 October, at 2:00 pm. The Reverend Michael Novajosky, Pastor of the Cathedral Parish of Bridgeport will be the celebrant and homilist, and The Reverend Donald Kloster will be the deacon. The Schola Cantorum of the Saint Gregory Society will sing the Gregorian chant and polyphony for the service.

Pope Pius XI instituted the feast of Christ the King in his Encyclical Letter of Quas primas of 1925. In this letter the Pope showed how laïcism and secularism, by organizing society without any reference to God, lead to the apostasy of the masses and the ruin of society because of their complete denial of Christ’s Kingship, which is one of the greatest heresies of our time. The Pope proposed this feast as an annual liturgical assertion of Christ’s divine right of Kingship as an effective means of combating this pernicious heresy.

By its position on the last Sunday in October, towards the end of the Liturgical Year and just before the All Saints Day, the feast of Christ the King comes at the climax of the celebration of all Christ’s mysteries and a kind of earthly anticipation of his everlasting reign over the elect in the glory of heaven.  

Music for the liturgy will include the Gregorian chant ordinary “Missa Marialis” (Vatican edition IX/X), the Mass proper for the feast of Christ the King (“Dignus est agnus”), motets by John Dunstable and Guillaume Dufay, and organ music by Jacques Boyvin and Guillaume de Nivers.

TLM for the Eighteenth Sunday after Pentecost

The Eighteenth Sunday after Pentecost will be observed in a celebration of High Mass at St. Stanislaus Church, State Street at Eld Street in New Haven, on Sunday, 13 October, at 2:00 pm. The Reverend Peter Langevin, Chancellor of the Diocese of Norwich, and the Schola Cantorum of the Saint Gregory Society will sing the Gregorian chant and polyphony for the service.

During these last Sundays of the liturgical year, the Church reminds us with special emphasis of the of the return of Christ when he comes at the end of time to lead us the house of His Father. All the parts of the Mass proper for this Sunday mention the house of God as a prefiguration of heaven, the eternal temple which all nations are summoned to enter. Belonging to the Church means entering here on earth the House of the Lord and obtaining in full measure the treasures of salvation that Christ there bestows upon us.

The Church on earth is the heavenly city which is building up here below, in which, through the ministry of her priests, we receive the pardon of sins, the sacrifice of the Mass, and the Eucharist, which enable us to participate increasingly in the divine life and prepare us for the everlasting life.

Music for the liturgy will include the Gregorian chant ordinary “Missa Marialis” (Vatican edition IX/X), the Mass proper for the 18th Sunday after Pentecost (“Da pacem, Domine”), motets by Tomás Luis de Victoria, and organ music by Antonio de Cabezon and Francisco Correa de Arrauxo

Michaelmas September 29

The Feast of the Dedication of the Basilica of St. Michael the Archangel commonly known as Michaelmas, will be observed in a celebration of High Mass at St. Stanislaus Church, State Street at Eld Street in New Haven, on Sunday, 29 September, at 2:00 pm. The Reverend Peter Langevin, Parochial Vicar of the Cathedral of St. Patrick, Norwich, will be the celebrant and homilist, and the Schola Cantorum of the St. Gregory Society will sing the Gregorian chant for the service.

The Hebrew name Michael means “Who is like unto God?” and recalls the battle in heaven between the prince of the heavenly host and the devil, a battle that began with Lucifer’s rebellion and continues down through the ages. In this tremendous struggle Michael and his angels, together with the Church and her saints, are Christ’s allies against Satan and his demonic cohorts. At the offertory of the Requiem Mass, the church prays that God’s Standard-bearer Michael may lead the departed Christian soul into heaven.  The offertory at Michaelmas reminds us that St. Michael also presides over our worship, for he is the angel whom St. John saw in heaven near God’s altar, censer in hand, offering the fragrant incense of the prayers of the saints.

As the Church Militant faces these scandal-ridden days, it behooves Christians everywhere redouble their devotion to St. Michael and to invoke him daily in the prayer ordered by Pope Leo XIII to be said after every Low Mass:

Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle. Be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the Devil. May God rebuke him, we humbly pray, and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly hosts, by the power of God, thrust into hell Satan, and all the evil spirits, who prowl about the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.