Category Archives: Lent

Holy Week: Blessing of Palms, Procession, and High Mass

Palm Sunday will be celebrated in the traditional Latin form in the Blessing of Palms, Procession and High Mass at St. Stanislaus Church, State Street at Eld Street, in New Haven on April 10, at 2:00 pm. The celebrant will be the Rever­end Jan Pikulski.

In the liturgy of Palm Sunday, the two-fold point of view from which the Church regards the Cross is expressed in two ceremonies, one marked by joy and the other by sadness. First comes the Blessing and Procession of Palms, in which everything overflows with a holy joy, enabling us after twenty centuries to revive the spirit of the magnificent scene of our Lord’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem. Then follows the Mass with its chants and lessons relating exclusively to the sorrowful memory of our Redeem­er’s Passion.

We should keep carefully a blessed palm branch in our home. This palm is a sacramental, and, fastened to our crucifix, should serve to remind us of the victory gained for us by Christ on the Cross.

Music for the service performed by members of the Schola Cantorum of the St. Gregory Society, will include the proper Gregorian chants for the the Blessing of Palms, Procession and Mass, the Missa ‘Orbis Factor’ ordinary (Vatican ed. XI), the motet “Adoramus te, Christe” by Orlando di Lasso, and the plainsong hymn, “Vexilla Regis prodeunt.”

 

High Mass for Laetare Sunday

The Fourth Sunday in Lent or “Laetare Sunday” will be celebrated in a Latin High Mass at St. Stanislaus Church, State Street at Eld Street, in New Haven on March 27, at 2:00 pm.  The celebrant will be the Reverend Jan Pikulski.

Laetare Sunday marks the midpoint of the season of Lent in preparation for the great feast of Easter. On this day the Church takes “time out” from the penitential emphasis in the texts of the liturgy in Lent to encourage Christians with the reminder of the great reward of Christ’s redemptive presence in the world. The opening Introit at Mass “Laetare, Jerusalem” exhorts us as citizens of the New Jerusalem to rejoice as we enter the house of the Lord; the Epistle encourages us to rejoice in Christ as the true Moses who has released us from the bondage of the law and sin; and the Gospel, presenting the miracle of the multiplication of  loaves and fishes, reminds us to rejoice in the Eucharist, which is the figure of the heavenly banquet.

This spirit of rejoicing is reflected in the use of rose-colored vestments and the organ on this Sunday.  Fortified by this liturgy filled with thought of Easter, let us go forward in the second half of Lent with courage and generosity in our penance, prayer and charitable works.

Music for the service performed by members of the Schola Cantorum of the St. Gregory Society, will include the Gregorian chant proper for the Mass (Laetare), the motets “Memento salutis auctor” and “Ave verum Corpus” by William Byrd, and organ music by Byrd and Orlando Gibbons.

Mass for the Second Sunday in Lent

The Second Sunday in Lent will be celebrated in a traditional Latin High Mass at St. Stanislaus Church, State Street at Eld Street, in New Haven on March 6 at 2:00 pm. The celebrant will be the Reverend Matthew Mauriello.

Between Moses and Elias on Mount Tabor, Jesus shows forth his divine glory, thus foreshadowing His resurrection. He in Whom His Father was well pleased has joined Himself in fellowship with us, even taking on flesh like unto our sinful flesh, as St. Paul says. He died on the cross to make us co-heirs of His glory and the well-beloved children of His Father in heaven.  He is our elder brother and head; in our prayer we should claim kinship with Him; we should obey His law and unite ourselves with Him in our endeavor to purify ourselves and raise ourselves up towards God.  The texts of the liturgy of this second Sunday in Lent put before us all those dispositions of soul that should be ours in God’s presence in this glorious manifestation of the divinity of Jesus.

Let the light of the grandeur of Jesus transfigured prepare us for a contemplation of the humiliation of His Passion.

Music for the service performed by the Schola Cantorum of the St. Gregory Society, will include the Gregorian chant Missa Orbis factor (Vatican edition XI), the chant proper for the Mass (Reminiscere), and polyphonic motets by Guillaume Dufay and Leon Leoni.

How to get a plenary indulgence on Fridays in Lent

During the Fridays of Lent, you may obtain a plenary indulgence by reciting after Holy Communion the following prayer before a crucifix, or image of Christ crucified. The normal conditions for an indulgence also apply.

PRAYER in LATIN

En ego, o bone et dulcíssime Iesu,
ante conspéctum tuum génibus me provólvo,
ac máximo ánimi adóre te oro atque obtéstor,
ut meum in cor vívidos fídei, spei, et caritátis sensus,
atque veram peccatórum meórum pæniténtiam,
eáque emendándi firmíssimam voluntátem velis imprímere;
dum magno ánimi afféctu et dolóre
tua quinque vúlnera mecum ipse consídero
ac mente contémplor,
illud præ óculis habens,
quod iam in ore ponébat tuo David prophéta de te, o bone Iesu:
Fodóderunt manus meas et pedes meos:
dinumeravérunt ómnia ossa mea.

PRAYER in ENGLISH

Behold, O kind and most sweet Jesus,
I cast myself upon my knees in Thy sight,
and with the most fervent desire of my soul I pray and beseech Thee
that Thou wouldst impress upon my heart lively sentiments of Faith, Hope, and Charity,
with true repentance for my sins, and a firm purpose of amendment,
whilst with deep affection and grief of soul I ponder within myself
and mentally contemplate
Thy five most precious Wounds;
having before my eyes the words which David in prophecy spoke concerning Thyself, O good Jesus:
“They have pierced my hands and feet;
they have numbered all my bones.”