Requiem Mass for St Gregory Purgatorial Society

RequiemThe Saint Gregory Society remembers all those deceased whose names are enrolled in the Purgatorial Society. Since the 11th century the Church has had the practice and desire to pray for the salvation the souls in purgatory. The spiritual benefits of the Purgatorial Society: the person is remembered at every First Friday Mass at 8 a.m. as well as on All Souls’s Day, in the daily prayers and good works of the Society, and at a Requiem Mass (Missa Cantata) scheduled in November.

This year the Requiem Mass is on Friday, November 20th at 7:00 p.m.

Those wishing their loved ones’ names to be remembered in the Purgatorial Society ought to submit the names to the Saint Gregory Purgatorial Society, P.O. Box 891, New Haven, CT., 06504. The annual enrollment is $35.00 for the first name, and $10.00 for an additional name. All benefactions support the good work of the Saint Gregory Society.

More information visit this page.

2016 Liturgical Calendar

Calendar cover 2016Dear Friend of the Saint Gregory Society,

As we approach the glorious time of year in which we celebrate the Nativity of Our Lord, we hope you will consider the publications of the Saint Gregory Society as uniquely appropriate gift items.

Our liturgical calendar, Christmas cards, and recordings are one way in which you can “put Christ back into Christmas” this season, and your order will help the Society continue in its mission of supporting and promoting the Traditional Liturgy. You can purchase the calendar, cards and recordings at the Society’s online store.

The Officers of the Society wish you a blessed Advent and Christmastide.

All Souls’ Mass 2015

Souls and angelThe Traditional Latin Mass will be offered at 5:30 p.m., on Monday, 2 November 2015, for All Souls’ Day.

“If we had no care for the dead,” St. Augustine noted, “we would not be in the habit of praying for them.”

One of the Spiritual Works of Mercy is to pray for the dead. The age-old custom of visiting the cemetery to pray for the dead during November, especially within the first eight days, is a venerable tradition. During the first eight days of November, the faithful who visit the cemetery to pray for the faithful departed by praying for the Pope’s intentions using the Lord’s Prayer, the Creed, and receiving sacramental confession, Eucharistic Communion, receive a indulgence.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches: “The Christian meaning of death is revealed in the light of the Paschal Mystery of the Death and Resurrection of Christ in whom resides our only hope. The Christian who dies in Christ Jesus is ‘away from the body and at home with the Lord’ (2 Cor 5:8)” (1681).

You may want to unite your prayers with a prayer given to us by Saint Gertrude the Great that connects the merits the Sacrifice of the Mass and our hope in the mercy of God:

Eternal Father, I offer Thee the Most Precious Blood of Thy Divine Son, Jesus, in union with the Masses said throughout the world today, for all the holy souls in Purgatory, for sinners everywhere, for sinners in the Universal Church, those in my own home and within my own family. Amen.

During the Octave of All Saints there are opportunities for a plenary indulgence:

  • applied only to the souls in Purgatory, gained on the 2nd by making a visit to a church to pray the Our Father, and the Creed, or,
  • applied only to the souls in Purgatory, gained by visiting your beloved dead, sometime during the week between November 1 to November 8, offering the simple invocation to God for the dead, called the “Eternal Rest” prayer is used:  Eternal rest grant unto him/her (them), O Lord; and let perpetual light shine upon him/her (them). May he/she (they) rest in peace. Amen.

During your visit to the graves of your beloved, make sure the resting site is properly cared for, sprinkling them with holy water, and adorning the graces with flowers (especially chrysanthemums and marigolds) to symbolize the Eden-like paradise that man and woman was created to enjoy.

Welcome

saint_stan_sgs_easter_3_closeWelcome to the new webpage of the Saint Gregory Society.

Our Society sponsors the Traditional Latin Mass in New Haven, Connecticut, each Sunday at 2:00 p.m. at Saint Stanislaus Church (State and Eld Streets).

Sermon: The Good Shepherd

Sermon on The Good Shepherd (John 10:11-16)
given by Fr. Dennis Kolinski, SJC
St. Stanislaus Church in New Haven, CT
The Second Sunday after Easter, 14 April 2013

The readings, which we hear every Sunday during Mass come from a different time and different culture, but they, nonetheless, tell us about things, which are still current. Perhaps, the context is different, but human nature has not changed. Listening to the Holy Scriptures we should see not only prophets and apostles, Jews and Greeks but also ourselves. Sometimes we see the connection right away but sometimes it isn’t as readily apparent. But the words of Scripture are words, which should always speak directly to us.

For instance, in today’s gospel from St. John Christ calls Himself the Good Shepherd and us His sheep. “I am the Good Shepherd; a good shepherd is ready to lay down his life for his sheep. … I am the Good Shepherd; I know my own and my own know me. … they will heed my voice, and there will be one flock with one shepherd.”1 And in his first epistle St. Peter, the head shepherd of the Church after Christ’s Ascension into heaven, continued the same analogy that his Master used, writing, “For you were once like straying sheep, but now you have turned back to the Shepherd who watches over your souls.”2

Christ spoke about us this way because we are really very similar to sheep, which are very helpless animals. They need a sheepherder to constantly lead them to water and to pasture. Sometimes they wander far away from the flock and get lost. They can’t defend themselves. They can’t quite seem to make it on their own and are reliant on the shepherd for so many aspects of their existence. This doesn’t present a very flattering picture of how we are, but nonetheless, when we rely only on ourselves we are really very similar to sheep—helpless in many everyday matters and sometimes just plain stupid in some of the things that we do. We are constantly getting lost in the matters of this world and our earthly shepherds, who are acting in the name of the Supreme Shepherd, lead us back on the right road time and time again—just like sheep.

Christ remains the One True Shepherd of our souls, as both St. John and St. Peter wrote, but He knew that we would still need visible shepherds on this earth and that’s why He appointed other shepherds to act in His name, to take His place here on earth after He ascended to His Father in heaven. He left behind priests and bishops, who are called “pastors” from the Latin word for “shepherd.” And above all, He entrusted His sheep in a special way to the pope as His chief shepherd on earth.

There are those, however, who find themselves being led, not by the Good Shepherd and His appointed co-workers, but as St. John writes, by a “hired man,” who allows the wolf to ravage the flock and scatter the sheep, “for the hired man is not their shepherd and they are not his sheep.”3 The hired man is a false shepherd and the wolf that ravages the flock is the Devil.

We unfortunately have many false shepherds today and many of the sheep are being scattered. These false shepherds often imitate the voice of the True Shepherd and this is what makes them so dangerous. They fool the sheep into thinking that they are safe with them, but they actually lead them outside of the sheepfold, where they are left unprotected from attacks by the wolf. How many Catholics have been led astray by faulty or watered-down teachings? Many of them have believed their shepherds in good faith, just like sheep, not realizing that they have been led out of the fold.

And how many traditional Catholics have also been led astray because of those, who look like a true shepherd, or sound like a true shepherd, or act like a true shepherd, but are really only false shepherds, who are acting, not on the authority of the One True Shepherd, but only on their own authority? Beware! Just because it look right doesn’t mean that you are safe from false shepherds, who have also led many of Christ’s sheep astray under the pretext of tradition and orthodoxy.

Those, who have been seduced by false shepherds, find themselves outside of the sheepfold, no longer protected by the walls of the enclosure, which help guard against the attacks of the wolf. We have only one true shepherd here on earth that legitimately acts in the name of the Good Shepherd and that is Peter. And where Peter is, there is the Church. Whoever is not solidly with Peter is only a false shepherd, who “has no concern for the sheep.”4And if you aren’t solidly with Peter, then you’re acting like a Protestant, who is merely a sheep shepherding himself.

There will always be those, who don’t want to listen to the True Shepherd and lose their way. Modern man doesn’t like to think that he needs someone else’s guidance, much less someone to lead him. Modern man thinks that he is intelligent enough to decide for himself what is right. He doesn’t want to be shepherded and feels that he can lead himself. Wandering about thinking that he can shepherd himself and make his own decisions he may run into someone, who suits his own needs, thinking that this is a true shepherd. But before he knows it, he has wandered so far away from the flock that he can’t find his way back. This is precisely why Christ called us sheep and that’s why He said that we need a shepherd.

If we don’t find ourselves firmly within the sheepfold of the Church under its chief shepherd, our enemy, whose name is Satan, will sneak in and steal our souls. Because if we aren’t listening to the voice of the one, whom Christ left here to tend His flock in His place, then we are not listening to Christ. We must always be sure that we are the sheep, who listen to the Good Shepherd and follow Him, for if we aren’t we will we find out only too late that we have become the goats, who were separated from the sheep because they listened to the voice of another shepherd.

Christ called us His sheep and said that He is the Good Shepherd, who is ready to lay down His life for His sheep. He said, “I know my own and my own know me.”5 His sheep recognize His voice and follow Him. “For you were once like straying sheep, but now you have turned back to the Shepherd who watches over your souls.”6 Let us always make sure that we remain within His flock. Let us always make sure that it is His voice that we are following, for then “there will be one flock and one shepherd.”7

______________________
1 John 10:11-16.
2 1 Peter 2:25.
3 John 10:12.
4 John 10:13.
5 John 10:14.
6 1 Peter 2:25.
7 John 10:16.