Category Archives: Catechesis

July is the month of the Precious Blood of Jesus

July is dedicated to the Precious Blood of Jesus. July 1st is the particular feast day for the Precious Blood.

It was Blessed Pope Pius IX who instituted the feast in 1849 recognizing the devotion is as old as Christian dispensation.

You may know that the early Fathers taught that the Church was born from the pierced side of Jesus Christ on the cross, and that the sacraments were brought forth through His Blood.

“The Precious Blood which we worship is the Blood which the Savior shed for us on Calvary and reassumed at His glorious Resurrection; it is the Blood which courses through the veins of His risen, glorified, living body at the right hand of God the Father in heaven; it is the Blood made present on our altars by the words of Consecration; it is the Blood which merited sanctifying grace for us and through it washes and beautifies our soul and inaugurates the beginning of eternal life in it.

More on this important month, visit this link.

By the Precious Blood of the Lamb are we saved!

Corpus Christi Sunday 2019

Accademia – Procession in piazza San Marco by Gentile Bellini

The Feast of the Most Sacred Body and Blood of our Lord, or Corpus Christi, will be celebrated in a High Mass in the traditional Latin form at St. Stanislaus Church in New Haven on Sunday, June 9, at 2:00 pm. The celebrant will be The Reverend Peter Langevin, Chancellor of the Diocese of Norwich, the Reverend Dr. Richard Cipolla will be the deacon and preach and William Riccio will serve as the subdeacon.

In 1208 St. Juliana of Mont-Cornillon had a vision in which Christ instructed her to work for the institution of a feast in honor of His Body and Blood in the Eucharist. Responding to local establishment of such a feast in French dioceses on the Thursday after Trinity Sunday, Pope Urban IV instituted the feast of Corpus Christi universally in the Western Church in 1268. The pope requested that St. Thomas Aquinas compose the texts for the liturgy of feast, which include the propers sung at Mass notably the the sequence Lauda Sion and the chants sung in the procession.

The procession following the Mass reminds us of how the Israelites revered the Ark of the Covenant as the Presence of God among them. The Ark was carried before them by the Levites in a cloud of incense and the singing of the multitude. We Christians have a treasure far more precious, for in the Eucharist we possess God Himself.  Let us feel a holy pride in forming His escort and extolling his triumphs while He is in our midst.

Music for the service, sung by the Schola Cantorum of The Saint Gregory Society, will include the Gregorian Mass Ordinary IV, “Cunctipotens Genitor,” the Eucharistic hymns Pange lingua, Verbum supernum, Adoro te devote, and Sacris solemniis, the proper Gregorian chants, and organ music by Jean Titelouze and Guillaume de Nivers.

Fifth Sunday after Easter

The Fifth Sunday after Easter will be celebrated in a High Mass in the traditional Latin form at St. Stanislaus Church in New Haven on Sunday, May 26, at 2:00 pm. The celebrant will be The Reverend Peter Langevin, Chancellor of the Diocese of Norwich and Parochial Vicar of the Cathedral of St. Patrick, Norwich.

The proper texts of the liturgy for this Sunday’s Mass continue to sing of Christ’s victory and of the salvation of Christian people whom He has redeemed. During the Rogation Days that follow, the Church exhorts us to pray in “His name” and ask for what is necessary for us, salvation first and foremost; these prayers will unfailingly be granted us “that our joy may be full.”

We must ask, too, that we may be worthy to enter with Him into His Father’s kingdom, while acknowledging that prayer that is sincere implies generosity: St. Jame’s Epistle reminds us that it is not enough merely to pray; we must also be “doers of the Word.”

Music for the service, sung by the Schola Cantorum of The Saint Gregory Society, will include the Gregorian Mass Ordinary for Eastertide (Vatican Edition I: “Lux et origo,” Easter antiphons, and the proper Gregorian chants.

Second Sunday of Easter

The Second Sunday after Easter, or Good Shepherd Sunday, will be celebrated in a High Mass in the traditional Latin form at St. Stanislaus Church in New Haven on Sunday, May 5, at 2:00 pm. The celebrant will be the Reverend Jan Pikulski.

The Liturgy of the Second Sunday after Easter calls on the newly baptized to cling to Christ as the Shepherd of their souls. It is suitable, then, to keep a Good Shepherd Sunday, a fortnight after the Easter baptisms, with the beautiful parable from the Gospel and the Epistle in which St. Peter reminds us what it cost Jesus to bring us, the erring sheep, back to the sheepfold of salvation and to become the Shepherd of our souls.  

As St. Peter, chief pastor of the Church by the will of Christ, wrote those word of this Epistle reading, he was mindful of the greatness and responsibilities of his office; so well did he understand them that, following his divine Master he gave his life for his sheep.  We should remind ourselves that the ministry of the priesthood is for the faithful the incarnation and ever prolonged action of Him who remains always the one Shepherd of the Church and Savior of our souls. 

Music for the service, sung by the Schola Cantorum of The Saint Gregory Society, will include the Gregorian Mass Ordinary for Eastertide (Vatican Edition I: “Lux et origo,” motets by Guillaume Dufay and Claudio Monteverdi, and the proper Gregorian chants. 

Easter Sunday 2019

The Missa Cantata for Easter Sunday will be celebrated in the traditional Latin form at St. Stanislaus Church in New Haven on Sunday, April 21, at 2:00 pm. The Celebrant will be The Reverend Jan Pikulski.

The Feast of Easter commemorates the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead on the third day after his death on the cross on Good Friday. The Resurrection is the climax of Holy Week, and, indeed of the entire Church Year, as it represents the central tenet of Christian belief: Christ’s triumph over sin and death and redemption of fallen mankind.

Jesus confounded the powers of evil by clothing in glory the Body which had been the Victim of the cruelty of sinful man. Christ’s triumph over depth is the most conclusive proof of His divinity and is thus the foundation of our faith. “God hath given us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ. He hath raised us up together with Christ and hath made us sit together in the heavenly places.” (Ephesians 2.6)

Let us joyfully keep this day on which our Lord has restored life to us in His own rising from the dead, and affirm with the Church that “the Lord is risen indeed.” Like Him, let us make our Easter a passing to an entirely new way of life.

Music for the service, sung by the full Schola Cantorum of The Saint Gregory Society, will include Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina’s Missa Regina caeli, motets by Gregor Aichinger and Jachet de Berchem, and the proper Gregorian chants.