Gaudete Sunday 2018

The Third Sunday of Advent or Gaudete Sunday will be observed in a celebration of High Mass at St. Stanislaus Church, State Street at Eld Street, New Haven, this Sunday, December, at 2:00 pm. Father Peter J. Langevin, Parochial Vicar of the Cathedral of St. Patrick, Norwich, will be the celebrant and homilist, and the Schola Cantorum of the St. Gregory Society will sing the Gregorian chant for the service.

Gaudete Sunday marks the midpoint of Advent and, similar to Laetare Sunday in Lent, the penitential character of the liturgy is relaxed; e.g., the organ is played, flowers are permitted on the altar, and violet vestments are replaced with rose.  These externals are easily observable, but less obvious is the significance of some of the texts that the Church has selected for Gaudete Sunday’s liturgy.  For example, verse one from Psalm 84 occurs twice in the Mass propers for the day; first as the Introit verse, and then again as the Offertory Antiphon.  

While the appropriateness of some scriptural verses for proper texts is obvious, other scriptural verses often give the impression that they are generic without a close connection to the feast or season.  To ascertain the rationale behind the selection of a particular psalm verse often requires an understanding of how the psalm is interpreted as a prefiguration of Christ. A note at the head of Psalm 84 in the Douay Bible summarizes the meaning of the psalm as representing “the coming of Christ, to bring peace and salvation to man.” Additionally, The Saint Andrew Daily Missal explains verse one’s reference to the rescue of Jacob’s people from their captivity in Babylon as representing Christ freeing His people from the bondage of sin. With these insights, may our prayerful participation in this Sunday’s liturgy be enriched.

Music for the liturgy to be sung by the Schola Cantorum of the Saint Gregory Society will include the Missa Cum jubilo (Vatican edition IX) chant ordinary, the Gregorian proper for Advent Sunday: “Gaudete in Domino semper,” the Antiphon “Alma Redemptoris Mater” set by Joseph Kempter, and the Advent Hymn, “Veni Emmanuel.”

All in attendance at this Mass are cordially invited to a coffee hour sponsored by the Saint Gregory Society immediately following Mass in the Holy Name Society room in the basement of the school building next to the church.

Secular Franciscan Order in New Haven

The Secular Franciscan Order meets regularly in the basement of the Convent at St Stanislaus Church (State & Eld Streets) in New Haven.

On Saturday, December 29, there will be an “open meeting” at 10: 00 a.m. for those seeking one’s personal holiness, learning the Catholic Faith, and helping the poor. All are welcome to inquire.

For more information call Mary Welborn at the parish (203) 562-2828 (Tuesday – Friday, 9am to 4pm).

Latin Mass this week

This week we will have two Latin Masses in New Haven

First Friday, December 7, 8:00 a.m.

Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception, Saturday, December 8, 11:00 a.m.

Mary under the title of the Immaculate Conception is the patroness of the USA. It is also a holy day of obligation.

First Sunday of Advent

The First Sunday of Advent will be observed in a celebration of High Mass at St. Stanislaus Church, State Street at Eld Street, New Haven, this Sunday, December, at 2:00 pm. The Rev. John Pikulski will be the celebrant, and the Schola Cantorum of the St. Gregory Society will sing the Gregorian chant for the service.

The Post-Communion collect from the First Sunday of Advent sums up the purpose of this liturgical season praying “… that we may prepare with due reverence for the coming festival of our redemption.” Providing all of her great feasts with preparatory periods, during Advent the Church prepares us for the twofold coming of Christ; His first coming when He took flesh, which will be commemorated at Christmas, and His second coming mentioned in the gospel reading when we “… shall see the Son of Man coming on a cloud with great power and majesty.”

While Advent does not require obligatory acts of penance, the Church’s liturgy suggests that penance and repentance are the best means of preparation for the coming of Christ. St. Paul admonishes us in the epistle reading to “… cast off the works of darkness, and put on the armor of light …” that we may “… walk… not in rioting and drunkenness, not in chambering and impurities, not in contention and envy…” Furthermore, the penitential character of Advent is expressed liturgically through the use of violet vestments, the removal of flowers from the altar, the omission of the Gloria, the silence of the organ, etc. In fact, the liturgy during Advent is akin to Lent with the exception that the Alleluia is retained. Therefore, may we use this Advent season profitably in preparation not only for Christmas, but for the eschaton, i.e., the end of days and last things.”

Music for the liturgy to be sung by the Schola Cantorum of the Saint Gregory Society will include the Missa Orbis factor (Vatican edition XI) chant ordinary, the Gregorian proper for Advent Sunday: “Ad te levavi,” the hymn “Condite alme siderum” by Guillaume Dufay (1397-1474), and the Advent prose, “Rorate caeli desuper.”

Twenty-fifth Sunday after Pentecost

(c) Somerville College, University of Oxford; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

The Twenty-fifth Sunday after Pentecost will be observed in a celebration of High Mass at St. Stanislaus Church, State Street at Eld Street, New Haven, this Sunday, November 11, at 2:00 pm. The Rev. John Pikulski will be the celebrant, and the Schola Cantorum of the St. Gregory Society will sing the Gregorian chant for the service

The Gospel for the Twenty-fifth Sunday after Pentecost presents the parable of the wheat and the tares. Our Lord shows us how even though he has planted much good among us, an enemy (the devil) has sown evil in our midst as well. During our lives, the two are allowed to grow side by side according to our acceptance or rejection of God’s will. During the Last Judgment, the angels will separate the sons of the evil one (the tares) from the sons of the kingdom of heaven (the wheat).

During this close of the Church year when the liturgy invites us to meditate on last things, let us pray that we receive the discernment to choose to the good in our lives (the wheat) and to resist temptations to do evil (the tares).

Music for the service will include the Gregorian Mass Ordinary XI (“Orbis factor”), the proper Gregorian chants, the chant Antiphon “Domine, nonne bonum” the polyphonic motet “Ave verum corpus” by Josquin DesPrez (139), and organ music by Johann Pachelbel and J. S. Bach.