Mass canceled time-being

Due to the COVID 19 crisis the Archbishop of Hartford has cancelled Holy Mass until April 3rd.

Stay tuned to when the Latin Mass will be offered again.

In the meantime, let us pray for the victims and their families, and the medical professionals.

Second Sunday in Lent 2020

The Transfiguration, 1480 (oil on panel) by Bellini, Giovanni (c.1430-1516); Museo e Gallerie Nazionali di Capodimonte, Naples, Italy.

The Second Sunday in Lent will be celebrated in a Latin High Mass at St. Stanislaus Church in New Haven on March 8, at 2:00 pm. The celebrant will be the Reverend Jan Pikulski.

Between Moses and Elias on Mount Tabor, Jesus shows forth his divine glory, thus foreshadowing His resurrection. He in Whom His Father was well pleased has joined Himself in fellowship with us, even taking on flesh like unto our sinful flesh, as St. Paul says. He died on the cross to make us co-heirs of His glory and the well-beloved children of His Father in heaven. He is our elder brother and or head; in our prayer we should claim kinship with Him; we should obey His law and unite ourselves with Him in our endeavor to purify ourselves and raise ourselves up towards God. The texts of the liturgy of this second Sunday in Lent put before us all those dispositions of soul that should be ours in God’s presence.

Let the light of the grandeur of Jesus transfigured prepare us for a contemplation of the humiliation of His Passion.

Music for the service performed by the Schola Cantorum of the St. Gregory Society, will include the Gregorian chant Missa Orbis factor (Vatican edition XI), the chant proper for the Mass (Reminiscere), and polyphonic motets by Jachet de Berchem and Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina.

Requiem Mass for Philip A. Prince

A High Requiem Mass will be offered for repose of the soul of Philip A. Prince at St. Stanislaus Church, New Haven on Saturday, March 7 at 11:00 am by the Rev. Richard G. Cipolla, Pastor Emeritus of St. Mary’s Church, Norwalk.

Philip was a longtime member of the St. Gregory Society and the Society’s Schola Cantorum.

All are invited to attend.

Quinquagesima Sunday 2020

Quinquagesima Sunday will be celebrated in a traditional Latin High Mass at St. Stanislaus  Church, New Haven, Sunday, February 23, at 2:00 pm. The celebrant will be the Reverend Richard G. Cipolla, Pastor Emeritus of St. Mary’s Church, Norwalk.

The third of the Sundays preparing us for the fast of Lent, Quinquagesima, on the fiftieth day before Easter, signals that Ash Wednesday is close at hand. The great Benedictine abbot, Dom Prosper Guéranger, speaks of Quinquagesima as a “time of Abraham” because of Abraham’s “docility and devotedness in following the call of his God.”

In the Gospel of St. Luke on this day, our Lord prepares His  apostles for His coming sufferings, that is, His sacred Passion in Jerusalem. The blind man represents the sinners who break their relationship with God, rejecting the offer of the promises of the Kingdom because of fallen man’s own selfishness in pride. The cry of the blind man is our cry, too: “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!”. This prayer moved the heart of Jesus who stopped, called him, and healed him. This personal encounter prompted our Lord to ask the blind man to name the desire of his heart: “What do you want me to do for you?” the Lord asks him. “Master, let me receive my sight,” the blind man answers. “Go your way, your faith has saved you.”

Quinquagesima Sunday invites us to ask for the grace that the blind man had been given: sufficient awareness to beg for the Lord’s mercy in hearing our prayers for forgiveness of sins so that we may live in perfect freedom. Are we as Catholics prepared to be docile and devoted, like Abraham, like the blind man, before the promptings of the Holy Trinity?

Music for the service performed by the Schola Cantorum of the St. Gregory Society, will include the Gregorian chant ‘Missa Orbis factor’ (Vatican edition XI), the chant proper for the Mass (Esto mihi), polyphonic motets by Guillaume Dufay and Antonio Cebrián, and organ music by Eugène Gigout and Ernest Chausson.